HeadshotI am an Assistant Professor of Politics and Public Affairs at Princeton University, and I received my PhD in Business Administration (Political Economics) from Stanford Graduate School of Business. I primarily study campaign finance and business influence in American politics.

One dominant theme in my research is that stakeholders (e.g., employees, shareholders, and consumers) play a key role in the formation and the efficacy of corporate political strategy. For instance, I show that stakeholders’ demand for corporate political activities to reflect their personal values—which has intensified under partisan polarization and democratic backsliding—can not only erode strategic gains from corporate campaign contributions, but also transform such contributions into a form of corporate political advocacy. In addition, other research I have conducted demonstrates that firms in politicized industries (e.g., fossil fuel) can preempt opposition to their market expansion from community stakeholders by pivoting their campaign giving efforts to elect allied local politicians.

In other research projects, I have examined the political implications of technological innovation in online campaign fundraising platforms, the impact of real estate and cable news markets on campaign donors' and voters' support for the Tea Party movement, and how information from mandatory disclosures may serve as a governance mechanism to mitigate adverse selection in the campaign fundraising marketplace.

My peer-reviewed research has been published in or is conditionally accepted by the American Political Science Review. My work has received the Jack Walker prize by the Political Organizations and Parties section of the American Political Science Association. In 2020, I co-founded the American Political Science Association Pre-conference on Frontiers in Money in Politics Research.

Please email me if you have any questions or desire any additional materials.